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Carry and Conceal the Smart Way

 

carry and conceal

 

Carry and conceal has become a new concept for a lot of new gun owners.  Even some long time gun owners still don’t know how to properly carry and conceal.  Some believe that it is just throwing a gun inside their waistband underneath their belt.  Then there are others who simply put one in their pocket.

Unfortunately a lot of concealed carry permit classes do not teach the basics of carry and conceal.  They tend to teach when you should use your weapon and when not to.  Afterwards they take you to a range to practice a couple of shots.

How we carry and conceal to me is as important as when to use and not to use your weapon.  Done wrong you can cause printing which will bring a lot of unwanted attention including even possibly having the cops called on you.  If you carry and conceal incorrectly it can also affect how well you are able to defend yourself in a life or death situation.  So I wanted to give a few tips that I’ve learned on how to do it the smart way.

5 carry and conceal tips

  1. Don’t bring unwanted attention to yourself

The gun culture has really become popular as of late as a response to liberal pushes or attempts to limit the second amendment freedoms of America.  It has also become popular due to the increase in violence including mass shootings.  With the rise of popularity comes t-shirts and other items of clothing that advertise the person is a gun owner.

Don’t get me wrong.  I love these shirts and hats that a lot of us wear.  However, I believe we need to be careful as it will bring unwanted attention.  If you are going to the gun range with your buddies it would make total sense.  However, if you are running errands on the weekend like grocery shopping with these items of clothing it is going to alert others who may not be familiar with the culture.  The last thing you want is to be kicked out of a store because a bunch of butt hurt libtards are “offended” by your shirt.  Or possibly face wrongful accusations by them calling the cops on you.

The idea behind carry and conceal is that you don’t want others to know that you are armed.  Not only will that bring unwanted attention but if there is someone that has intentions of doing wrong they will know to take you out first because they know that you are armed. Or they know that can try to pull your weapon off of you. We want to be the grey man as much as possible.

  1. Wear properly fitting clothing

A rookie mistake that people who are new to carry and conceal tend to wear really baggy clothing hoping that it will hide their concealed weapon.  Unfortunately this only brings more unwanted attention.  When you are wearing baggy clothing people automatically think you are up to know good by hiding something underneath.

You will want to wear properly fitting pants as well.  If you are wearing lose pants they will tend to sag when you are armed.  You don’t want to be pulling up your pants every 2 minutes as this will again bring unwanted attention.  It will also affect your mobility and quick access to your concealed carry.

  1. Stop Tugging on your Shirt!

A lot of new gun owners tend to constantly tug at their shirt because they feel that it may be revealing too much.  This is really just out of paranoia.  By constantly tugging on your shirt or press checking you only making yourself appear suspicious and nervous.  As long as you are wearing properly fitting clothing you don’t have to constantly tug at your shirt.

  1. Get a proper holster

Having the proper holster will help you to carry and conceal properly.  This is especially true if you are carrying your weapon throughout the day.  It can get very uncomfortable.

You will want to find a comfortable holster.  You don’t want to have your sidearm poking into your appendix or side constantly throughout the day.  I would recommend something padded and that will wick moisture.  We sweat throughout the day so you don’t want to wear a holster that feels soggy.  So I would recommend something with a synthetic inside padding as it doesn’t retain much moisture like polyester.

The holster should also help you to quickly access your firearm.  You don’t want a piece of padding hanging over restricting your access.  It should also help with concealability.  Your firearm of course shouldn’t stick out like a sore thumb.

Finally the holster should help distribute weight across your waist.  Having 3 pounds hanging from your belt can pull on your pants.  Having a holster with wide clips help you distribute that weight.

My advice would be to check out Alien Gear Cloak Tuck Holsters.  It has made carrying extremely comfortable with padding that doesn’t retain moisture.  It also helps you to conceal properly with 6 different adjustments.

  1. Buy a Gun Belt

Traditional leather belts are not built to carry much weight.  They are typically designed just to keep your pants around your waist without taking into consideration what you may be carrying.  Gun belts are designed and built with reinforced material.  They can typically hold at least 3 pounds.

When considering gun belts there are multiple options to choose from.  First you need to understand the difference between concealed carry belts and a tactical belt.  Concealed carry gun belts are designed for everyday carry purposes.  Tactical belts are designed more for tactical training and can carry heavier amounts of gear.

The perfect gun belt should be thicker and stiffer than the traditional belt.  Thicker belts not only help with carrying heavier loads but also helps with comfortability.  It should also be at least 2.5 inches longer than you normal size.  Adding a concealed carry to your belt will obviously increase the size needed.

Again there are many gun belt options to choose from like traditional leather belts from Hanks Gunner or “tacticool” looking belts through 5.11.  Then there are ratchet belts like the Trakline belt through Kore Essentials which is my personal preference.  The Trakline belt is more fashionable instead of looking tactical and can fit almost every size unlike traditional loop belts.

Altogether these would be my suggestions on how how to carry and conceal the smart.  Please leave a comment below if you have any suggestions or questions.  Your feedback better helps the prepper community.

 

Photography by Ibro Palic

About Aaron

Aaron is the founder of Smart Prepper Gear which is a blog dedicated to helping people prepare the smart way now so that they can thrive later. He has been involved with preparedness since 2009 after feeling the effects of the financial crisis that affected most of the country. Aaron also volunteers with CERT (community emergency response team), ARC (Amateur Radio Club), Red Cross and currently studying to be a certified NRA instructor.